Gevril Group Adds Glam Rock Watches to Impressive Array of Brands

Glam Rock Watches


by Adrian Herscovici  

Gevril Group announced today that it has added Glam Rock watches to its lineup of fine watch brands. Gevril Group becomes the exclusive representative of Glam Rock watches in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean.

Glam Rock was founded by Italian designer Enrico Margaritelli and his wife and business partner Isabelle Maujean, both formerly of Fossil. Glam Rock watches are stylish, innovative and immensely popular worldwide.

“We are delighted to represent Glam Rock,” says Gevril Group owner and president Samuel Friedmann. “This is a partnership based on shared core values. Glam Rock isn’t about selling a label – it’s about offering Swiss made quality with luxurious finishings at an affordable cost. Gevril Group applauds this approach and welcomes Glam Rock to our family of brands.”

A survey of Glam Rock’s watch collections illustrates this mutual standpoint. The Bal Harbour, Miami and Vintage Glam collections, with their sultry and colorful south-Florida personas, fit well within Gevril Group lineup of vibrant fashion watches, a roster that already includes Calibre, Ferragamo, Gattinoni, GV2, Haurex, Hush Puppies, Johan Eric, Jowissa, Just Cavalli, Rüdiger, Versace, Versus and Viceroy.

“Glam Rock watches speak for themselves. These are watches with an independent spirit and style. They appeal to people who want to own well-made watches with imaginative designs, much like Versus by Versace or our own proprietary GV2 brand.” Friedmann adds.

Quality and customization are two important attributes of Glam Rock watches that impressed Gevril Group from day one. In addition to Swiss made movements, Glam Rock uses fine leathers, Techno Silk fabric, patterned silicon and stainless steel to create its interchangeable case covers, straps and bracelets. These qualities are not overlooked by trendsetters, either: Glam Rock watches are popular among celebrities and other demanding clientele who value detailed craftsmanship and up-to-the-minute styles in their fashionable, public lives.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupGevril Group, watchmaker and wholesale watch distributor, is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury and Swiss watches and trendy fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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Will Swatch Sistem51 Revolutionize the Watch Industry or Be Rejected by It?

Swatch Sistem51

by John Sealander  

Is the watch world ready for a super accurate, maintenance free, “Swiss made” mechanical timepiece that is mass-produced with only 51 parts?

SwatchThirty years ago Swatch revolutionized the watch industry with the introduction of the world’s first line of stylish, inexpensive quartz watches. Now, many say they’ve turned the world upside down again with the introduction of the world’s first high quality, all-mechanical movement assembled entirely by machine.

The innovative Swatch Sistem51 is unlike any mechanical watch ever made. There are only 51 components, compared to over 600 in most modern mechanical watches. The assembly of this watch has been 100% automated, using high-tech robots to weld together the individual components to create a single assembly centered on one screw. This unique timepiece has no regulator and is adjusted for life at the factory using a laser. The all-mechanical movement features a 90-hour power reserve and is hermetically sealed so that no moisture, dust or foreign objects can enter the watch or interfere with its operation.

Swatch Sistem51 Red Swatch Sistem51 White
Swatch Sistem51 Red Swatch Sistem51 White
Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image

The watch is 100% Swiss made, is self-lubricating, and is accurate to 5 seconds a day. Typically a Swiss made mechanical watch with these specifications will cost thousands of dollars, but the Sistem51 is expected to retail for less than $100. This mass-produced mechanical marvel is made using a special alloy of copper, nickel and zinc. It is non-magnetic, so the movement will never need adjusting. Since all the components are attached using a single screw, there is very little wear and tear.

Is There a Demand?

The big question now is whether there is a market for such a watch. Although extremely reliable and accurate, it has none of the snob appeal of its pricy handmade Swiss cousins. The Sistem51 is more expensive than equivalent Swatch quartz watches, yet offers far fewer features than the latest generation of “smart watches” that are starting to hit the market.

What the Swatch Sistem51 does offer is a super accurate, extremely reliable, all mechanical Swiss made movement in an inexpensive plastic case. Like any Swatch design, the Sistem51 can be easily customized with an unlimited number of color variations and face designs. Although the innovative watch has received wide praise for it’s technological innovations, it remains to be seen whether it will be commercially viable.

Does the market really want an inexpensive all-mechanical watch, or will people continue to prefer the exclusivity of handmade mechanical timepieces costing thousands more? Since the technology itself is revolutionary, it would not be surprising to see Swatch incorporate the new movement in some of its own high-end brands. Will there eventually be an Omega, Breguet, or Blancpain watch with a Sistem51 movement? Only time will tell.

Potential Game-Changer

The Japanese and Chinese already offer a wide variety of affordable mechanical timepieces. Currently however, when a watch says Swiss made on the dial, it is usually quite expensive. The breakthrough Sistem51 design might change all that.

If the Sistem51 design turns out to be as reliable as has been initially claimed, it could even cut into the sale of quartz watches. Why would people want to keep changing batteries when they could get a high quality self-winding mechanical watch for the same price?

Although the Swatch Sistem51 was introduced over a year ago at Baselworld 2013, it has only recently become available in retail markets. As people begin to discover this revolutionary new design, it could have a major impact on the entire watch industry. Nobody denies that this watch is a breakthrough. The only uncertainty at this point is whether it will be a commercial success.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupGevril Group, watchmaker and wholesale watch distributor, is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury and Swiss watches and trendy fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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The 3 Most Popular Watch Bezel Types

Watch Bezel


by Adrian Herscovici  

Interval meters, dive and GMT: The most popular types of watch bezels

One watch component that is referenced regularly is the bezel – a rim attached to the case and surrounding the dial that usually serves the purpose of holding the watch crystal in place.

Audemars Piguet Royal OakAt its simplest, the bezel is an unadorned ring, usually made from the same material as the watch case. Other bezels are decorated with inset gems or ornamental stones. Some even achieve iconic status because of their unmistakable shape and brilliant design – just look at the Royal Oak and others designed by the inimitable Gerald Genta.

Given the conspicuous position of the bezel on the front side of the watch, it also provides a convenient area to assign other useful tasks.

Interval Meters

A bezel is a great place to put markings for a chronograph interval meter. The most common of these is a tachymeter, which is typically used to calculate speed over a distance. The Fortis Official Cosmonauts Chronograph employs a tachymeter on the bezel. Other variations of interval meters include telemetric (to measure the speed of sound) and pulsimetric (to measure a pulse). A more thorough explanation of all three is here.

A rarer bezel in this category is the aviation-themed “slide rule” or “calculator rule.” Ferragamo features one on these on the Ferragamo F-80 Pilot. The bezel works in conjunction with the flange and interior markings for use as a pilot’s tool to calculate various operations including speed and fuel consumption. Learn about how to use one here.

Dive Watch Bezels

The most recognizable bezel of all is the dive bezel. The look is so popular that some brands incorporate it into watches as a non-functional design element. A dive bezel has a 60-minute scale, usually with large markers at the five-minute increments and smaller markers at the one-minute increments (at least between 15 and zero). The zero position is usually marked by an arrow and a luminous dot. The Fortis B-42 Marinemaster Chronograph employs a dive bezel of this description.

Originally designed to monitor elapsed time underwater, dive bezels can also be used in more practical scenarios like monitoring how much time is left in a parking meter or when to flip a steak on the barbecue. When used in scuba diving, the countdown measurement is a matter of life and death since divers use it to track how much oxygen remains in their tank*. A genuine dive bezel is unidirectional, i.e., it rotates in one direction only (counterclockwise) so if it moves, it will signify less air in the tank, meaning the worst case scenario is the diver surfaces with leftover oxygen. If it were to move in the opposite direction, the diver might think he or she has more time than oxygen remaining in the tank.

*Note: Most divers now rely on a dive computer rather than a dive bezel.

GMT and World Time Bezels

Another familiar bezel is the bidirectional GMT, usually with 24-hour markings. The bezel can be used in a few ways: one, to track a second time zone in conjunction with a dedicated GMT hand; to establish whether it is daytime or nighttime in that corresponding time zone; or to follow a third time zone altogether. A GMT watch is a favorite among pilots who regularly travel between time zones. For a detailed explanation visit this web page.

A variation of the GMT bezel is the world-time bezel, which displays the names of world cities. To use it, set the local time on the watch and turn the bezel to match the current city name with the local time using the 24-hour track – the times in all of the other cities now appear concurrently on the 24-hour track. The Fortis B-47 World Timer GMT has a world-time bezel (the watch also displays a second time zone by way of a rotating middle disk).

Other types of bezels will surely emerge as watch design evolves. The new RM 60-01 by Richard Mille, for example, has a rotating bezel with a compass. But whether you prefer the simplicity of a watch with nothing more than a traditional unadorned bezel, or something bejeweled in colorful stones, or a purpose-built dive bezel, the abundant options are part of what makes watch collecting so enjoyable.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupGevril Group, watchmaker and wholesale watch distributor, is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury and Swiss watches and trendy fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

Join the conversation! Follow Gevril Group on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Please subscribe to the Gevril Group newsletter and blog digest.

The Evolution of Watch Case Shapes

Unique Hamilton Ventura Watch Case


by Adrian Herscovici  

Taking Shape: Watch Case Basics

A watch case, simply described, is a container that houses a watch’s significant components: namely, the movement and its many parts. The case protects these vital workings from dust and moisture, and it assists in shielding the movement from the bumps of daily wear.

From this simple purpose, the watch case evolved into more than a protective shell. Through innovation, watchmakers found reliable and efficient solutions to deal with the elements, and so they turned more attention toward perfecting case-finishing techniques – the sort of detail-oriented work that, at one time, was limited to movement decoration.

In The Beginning

By default, the earliest wristwatch cases were round – round because that was the shape of pocket watches, and when watches made the transition from pocket to wrist, they were merely pocket watches fashioned into wristwatches. Round is still the most ubiquitous shape as it provides the best space to display analog configurations.

Besides round, the most common case shape is rectangular. Popular variations include tonneau (barrel shaped) and cushion (pillow shaped or rounded square). Some watchmakers go in completely new directions – check out the asymmetrical Hamilton Ventura or any watch by the brand MB&F – but in general, most watch cases are based on one of the two rudimentary forms.

Some watch cases are icons in their own right. The innovative Rolex Oyster is known the world over; Cartier’s Tank, released in 1917, is unmistakable, as is the legendary Reverso by Jaeger-LeCoultre. Every watch brand hopes to achieve this sort of lasting success – great design, after all, never goes out of style.

The Modern Era

While case shapes remain more or less consistent, size is on the rise. Contemporary watches are quite large, around 42 mm in diameter on average. By comparison, watches of the mid-20th century usually maxed out at around 34 mm. Now it is not uncommon to see watches that are 45 mm or larger.

Cases were originally made from metals, especially steel and gold. Today, plastic is used to make a majority of watch cases, since it is durable, lightweight and inexpensive. Applied coatings such as PVD, DLC and IP are also popular. For higher-end watches, stainless steel is the standard along with an array of precious metals, unique alloys – and even ceramic. Watch cases made from prized metals such as gold or platinum are more exclusive and therefore more expensive.

Excluding mechanical watch collectors and other purists who treasure the centuries-old practice of watch-movement decoration, the appearance of the case is, for many, the reason to buy a watch, since watches today are for fashion as well as function. And while it may be difficult to imagine a new shape finding a permanent place in the watch spectrum (and on our wrists), it is perhaps more rash to underestimate that our forward-zooming, information-toting selves won’t find need or want of something else in the ongoing quest to be original and to stay one step ahead.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupGevril Group, watchmaker and wholesale watch distributor, is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury and Swiss watches and trendy fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

Join the conversation! Follow Gevril Group on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Please subscribe to the Gevril Group newsletter and blog digest.