Will Swatch Sistem51 Revolutionize the Watch Industry or Be Rejected by It?

Swatch Sistem51

by John Sealander  

Is the watch world ready for a super accurate, maintenance free, “Swiss made” mechanical timepiece that is mass-produced with only 51 parts?

SwatchThirty years ago Swatch revolutionized the watch industry with the introduction of the world’s first line of stylish, inexpensive quartz watches. Now, many say they’ve turned the world upside down again with the introduction of the world’s first high quality, all-mechanical movement assembled entirely by machine.

The innovative Swatch Sistem51 is unlike any mechanical watch ever made. There are only 51 components, compared to over 600 in most modern mechanical watches. The assembly of this watch has been 100% automated, using high-tech robots to weld together the individual components to create a single assembly centered on one screw. This unique timepiece has no regulator and is adjusted for life at the factory using a laser. The all-mechanical movement features a 90-hour power reserve and is hermetically sealed so that no moisture, dust or foreign objects can enter the watch or interfere with its operation.

Swatch Sistem51 Red Swatch Sistem51 White
Swatch Sistem51 Red Swatch Sistem51 White
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The watch is 100% Swiss made, is self-lubricating, and is accurate to 5 seconds a day. Typically a Swiss made mechanical watch with these specifications will cost thousands of dollars, but the Sistem51 is expected to retail for less than $100. This mass-produced mechanical marvel is made using a special alloy of copper, nickel and zinc. It is non-magnetic, so the movement will never need adjusting. Since all the components are attached using a single screw, there is very little wear and tear.

Is There a Demand?

The big question now is whether there is a market for such a watch. Although extremely reliable and accurate, it has none of the snob appeal of its pricy handmade Swiss cousins. The Sistem51 is more expensive than equivalent Swatch quartz watches, yet offers far fewer features than the latest generation of “smart watches” that are starting to hit the market.

What the Swatch Sistem51 does offer is a super accurate, extremely reliable, all mechanical Swiss made movement in an inexpensive plastic case. Like any Swatch design, the Sistem51 can be easily customized with an unlimited number of color variations and face designs. Although the innovative watch has received wide praise for it’s technological innovations, it remains to be seen whether it will be commercially viable.

Does the market really want an inexpensive all-mechanical watch, or will people continue to prefer the exclusivity of handmade mechanical timepieces costing thousands more? Since the technology itself is revolutionary, it would not be surprising to see Swatch incorporate the new movement in some of its own high-end brands. Will there eventually be an Omega, Breguet, or Blancpain watch with a Sistem51 movement? Only time will tell.

Potential Game-Changer

The Japanese and Chinese already offer a wide variety of affordable mechanical timepieces. Currently however, when a watch says Swiss made on the dial, it is usually quite expensive. The breakthrough Sistem51 design might change all that.

If the Sistem51 design turns out to be as reliable as has been initially claimed, it could even cut into the sale of quartz watches. Why would people want to keep changing batteries when they could get a high quality self-winding mechanical watch for the same price?

Although the Swatch Sistem51 was introduced over a year ago at Baselworld 2013, it has only recently become available in retail markets. As people begin to discover this revolutionary new design, it could have a major impact on the entire watch industry. Nobody denies that this watch is a breakthrough. The only uncertainty at this point is whether it will be a commercial success.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupGevril Group, watchmaker and wholesale watch distributor, is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury and Swiss watches and trendy fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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Hublot Chairman Accuses Apple of Stealing Watchmakers

Hublot Watchmakers


by John Sealander  

Will your next smartwatch say “Swiss made” on the dial?

When Jean-Claude Biver, the head of the Watches and Jewelry division of LVMH and the Chairman of luxury watch brand Hublot, accused Apple of trying to poach some of his best Hublot employees, it started a firestorm of speculation within the watch industry. What was Apple up to? It has long been anticipated that Apple will instantly become a major player in the burgeoning smartwatch category when it introduces its almost inevitable iWatch. Why was the company looking to Switzerland?

Although nobody knows when an iWatch will reach the market, almost everybody agrees that it is coming. With Apple’s design expertise and proven record at popularizing new technology, expectations for Apple’s upcoming smartwatch are high. The market clearly expects something spectacular from the Cupertino giant.

What the Swiss Have to Offer

While nobody expects Apple to include a tourbillon or a moon phase complication in its upcoming iWatch, there is still a lot that Swiss watch experts have to offer a potential smartwatch powerhouse. Watchmakers take metallurgy seriously. For hundreds of years, Swiss watchmakers have been experts at creating entirely new metals and alloys, just to solve a watchmaking problem.

Hublot Watch with Magic GoldOne of these high tech alloys is called Magic Gold, and it was developed by the very Hublot that Jean-Claude Biver says Apple was trying to raid. Magic Gold is a proprietary combination of ceramic and gold that Hublot has used to make watchcases virtually scratch proof. Is it just coincidence that Apple tried to license this special alloy for use in the iPhone 5 in 2013? Later that year, Apple released an all-new gold version of its popular phone and it is still looking for a way to make its cases scratchproof.

Some industry experts say that Apple may want their upcoming iWatch to say Swiss made on the dial. While this is a possibility, it is highly unlikely, since the company has always been extremely proud of its California roots. The term “Swiss made,” which has long been associated with high quality mechanical watches, would hold little value to a customer buying wearable technology. There are no springs and gears in a smartwatch and there never will be.

Swiss Expertise

What is more likely is that Apple is considering opening a new R&D facility in Switzerland. Steve Jobs was always fond of borrowing ideas from other disciplines and incorporating them in Apple designs. “Good artists copy. Great artists steal,” he said once, lending credence rumors that Apple actually is poaching talent from leading Swiss watchmakers.

It makes sense. The Swiss have been experts in manufacturing all sorts of things for hundreds of years. In Switzerland, Apple could recruit from an amazing pool of watchmaking talent. While Apple doesn’t need the Swiss to put a tourbillon in a smartwatch, they do need Swiss process engineering, ergonomics, metallurgy, and miniaturization expertise. Hiring the best talent they can find from well-respected companies like Hublot, might just give them the competitive edge they are looking for.

While it is fun to speculate whether your new iWatch will say “Swiss made” on the dial, the accusations of talent poaching do have serious implications. Watchmaking is a billion dollar industry and the market for wearable technology is potentially even larger. The Swiss should actually be happy that Apple is looking at them. If Apple hires a few watch experts from Hublot, it won’t hurt the industry. Instead, it will probably help. By acknowledging Swiss expertise, Apple is telling the world what watch aficionados have known all along: Swiss watchmakers are the best in the world at what they do.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupGevril Group, watchmaker and wholesale watch distributor, is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury and Swiss watches and trendy fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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Signet Jewelers to Buy Zales

Zales Store


by John Sealander  

Who benefits most when two jewelry juggernauts join forces?

When Signet Jewelers, the parent company of familiar names like Kay Jewelers and Jared the Galleria of Jewelry, acquired the giant Zales Corporation with its well-known Zales and Gordons brands, a jewelry juggernaut was created. Signet and Zales were already the two largest jewelers in the United States before this historic merger. Together, they have the opportunity to become an unstoppable powerhouse that virtually controls the US retail jewelry market.

Jared Galleria of Jewelry Store Kay Jewelers Store
Jared Galleria of Jewelry Store Kay Jewelers Store
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Investors have already benefited from this sale, with shares of Zales surging 40% on the merger news. Signet shares also rose 12% to a record 52-week high. The jury is still out on whether this monumental merger will offer the same sort of benefits for customers. Consolidation in other industries has shown mixed benefits. The economies of scale that a larger organization brings often result in lower prices for consumers. These savings come at a price however. A large organization must streamline their supply chain to maintain profitability targets, and smaller vendors are often eliminated. This means that although prices are typically good, consumers often have fewer choices.

Michael BarnesAccording to Signet CEO Michael Barnes, “the addition of Zale to the Signet family is consistent with our long-term growth strategy and leverages our combined operating expertise to create better choices for our customers, new opportunities for our employees and makes us a more attractive partner to our vendors.”

Based on what Michael Barnes has already accomplished with his Signet brands, this means big changes for the Zales Corporation in the years ahead. Signet has already completed a multi-year turnaround program that has returned the corporation to profitability. They will almost certainly use the same strategies to return their newly acquired Zales and Gordons brands to profitability as well.

A Retail Jewelry Powerhouse

The combined companies from this monumental $1.4 billion dollar transaction will operate more than 3,600 stores in the United States, in addition to each brands’ online retail operations. It is estimated that this new jewelry powerhouse will generate annual sales in excess of $6 billion. The company will employ nearly 30,000 people.

The merger, which will be financed by bank debt, other debt financing and the securitization of a significant portion of Signet’s accounts receivable portfolio, is still subject to the approval of Zale’s stockholders and must meet regulatory requirements. Industry insiders expect that the sale will go through however, and the transaction is expected to close later this year.

Since all of the brands involved sell watches, the merger will have definite implications for the watch industry. Consolidation is already a fact of life within the luxury industry, so there will probably be no surprises. Some brands will grow stronger through improved access to a larger customer base. Other fringe brands may be hurt, especially if they are eliminated as a Signet vendor.

One thing is certain. With $6 billion in projected sales, there will still be a lot of people buying fine jewelry and luxury watches.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupWatchmaker and wholesale watch distributor Gevril Group is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury, Swiss and fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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History of Water Resistance in Watches


by Adrian Herscovici  

From Oyster to Ocean Floor: A Brief History of Water-Resistant Watches

Watch lovers are a neurotic bunch. It makes sense: when you’re passionate about miniature mechanical or electronic engines encased in polished metals that often cost in the hundreds or thousands of dollars, there’s a lot to be persnickety about. Water resistance is one of those particulars.

Water – along with dust, shocks and magnetism – is one of the oldest adversaries of the wristwatch. Shock absorption has been mastered to a great degree and magnetizing a watch is still a relatively rare occurrence, but sealing a watch from dust and moisture is as relevant as ever; water, especially, can do serious damage to a watch movement. Here’s an overview of how water resistance developed over the course of the 20th century.

Hans Wilsdorf and the Rolex Oyster

Hans WilsdorfThe forefather of water-resistant watches is none other than Hans Wilsdorf, the founder of Rolex, which introduced the first truly water-resistant watch in 1927 – the Rolex Oyster. The crucial inventions that led to the Oyster, however, were conceived of by others.

Swiss watchmaker François Borgel patented a threaded screw-back case system in 1891 that would become the basis of the Rolex Oyster. Borgel’s design involved fitting the dial and movement into a threaded carrier ring; the bezel and crystal also mounted onto the carrier ring, and the entire assembly then screwed into the case frame from the front. The design significantly reduced the ability of dust and water to enter the case and was a huge improvement over common hinged or snap-on backs and bezels.

By the early 1920s, many companies were using the Borgel design. But in terms of meaningful water resistance, the his design still had one serious flaw: the stem opening (where the winding stem and crown attach), unlike the screw-back case, was not adequately sealed. That is until 1925, when two Swiss watchmakers by the names of Paul Perregaux and Georges Peret patented a screw-down stem system.

Wilsdorf recognized that the two innovations together were the solution to creating a genuinely water-resistant watch case. He negotiated the purchase of Perregaux’s and Peret’s patent in 1926 and combined it with Borgel’s hermetically sealed case design and a fitted crystal. The result was the Rolex Oyster – so named for the fact that it could remain in water without being damaged – like an oyster. The concept remains the paradigm for water-resistant watch cases to this day.

Daily Mail Front Page - Rolex OysterThe Oyster design became a huge commercial success thanks in part to Wilsdorf’s marketing prowess. During the summer of 1927 a London secretary named Mercedes Gleitze swam across the English Channel with an unlikely companion: she wore a Rolex Oyster on her wrist. The watch survived the journey, remained watertight and kept time for the duration of the roughly fifteen-hour swim to Calais in France. Wilsdorf followed up by buying the entire front page of the Daily Mail to announce the accomplishment. The headline read: “Rolex introduces for the first time the greatest Triumph in Watch-making ‘ROLEX OYSTER’ The Wonder Watch that Defies the Elements.” The publicity helped launched Rolex as a global brand.

Mercedes Gleitze Swimming the Channel Mercedes Gleitze’s Rolex Oyster
Mercedes Gleitze Swimming the English Channel Mercedes Gleitze's Rolex Oyster
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The Next Wave

By the 1930s other companies were trying their hand at water-resistant watches. They included a watch designed by Cartier for the Pasha of Marrakesh with a specially designed screw-down crown (and later inspired the watches of the current Pasha collection), as well as the Omega Marine, which featured a case within a case. Companies also began introducing gaskets as part of systems to improve water resistance for a reasonable cost. In the early 1940s, for example, Fortis marketed its first waterproof automatic wristwatch called the Fortissimo.

Fortis Fortissimo Omega Marine
Fortis Fortissimo Omega Marine

But for the most part, water-resistant watches were still viewed as tools for specialists. During the Second World War, several highly water resistant diver’s watches were introduced for use by military frogmen. These watches were usually quite large for the purpose of being legible underwater and often featured bulky systems to seal the crown and stem. The Italian company Panerai, for example, supplied Italy’s navy frogmen with large dive watches and underwater compasses (early Panerai watches used Rolex movements). Panerai later patented an iconic pressure-lever crown that is still in use today. Nonetheless, at the time, these early dive watches were too large and impractical for general use.

The Wristwatch Goes Deep

Original Rolex SubmarinerThe proliferation of the modern dive watch can also be traced back to Rolex and its introduction of the iconic Submariner in 1953. The original Submariner was water-resistant to a depth of 100 meters/330 feet and its design was an instant success. It wasn’t the first dive watch designed for daily wear, but it was the first commercially successful one. It also introduced the unidirectional dive bezel for measuring elapsed time that is so commonly associated with dive watches today.

Some argue that the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms dive watch predated the Submariner (by a matter of months), which may be true, but the popularity and influence of the Submariner is unparalleled. Thanks to these and others, the modern dive watch category is hugely popular today.

Water Resistance Today – There is No Such Thing as Too Deep

Today, adequate water resistance is expected; after all, the average quartz watch is built to handle the occasional dip in the pool or accidental submersion and, in the case of mechanical watches, there are tons of sport-watch options that have suitable water-resistance ratings for general immersion. (To learn more about general water resistance, read Mechanical Watch Water Resistance).

In addition, our human obsession with over-engineering drives us to try and surpass our previous bests, and so the importance of water resistance is often exaggerated. For example, thanks to the Submariner there are countless watches that can withstand submersion to depths in the hundreds and thousands of feet – depths at which few people, if any, will ever go – when really all that most people will ever need is a watch that can withstand a tropical storm or a leisurely swim at a whopping depth of, perhaps, 15 feet.

Needless to say, whatever demands your profession or lifestyle put on you to go deeper, there is a watch that will serve you ably from the shallowest pool to the ocean’s depths.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupWatchmaker and wholesale watch distributor Gevril Group is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury, Swiss and fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie 2014 Recap

SIHH 2014 Entrance


By Roberta Naas

What Really Goes on in Geneva Doesn’t Stay in Geneva

Every year the watch industry celebrates newness and invention at two very important Swiss events: the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH) held in January in Geneva; BaselWorld (held in March in – you guessed it – Basel). Having just returned from Geneva, I have to take a few minutes to reflect on the show.

SIHH 24th Edition 2014 InvitationIt was the 24th edition of the SIHH and it has certainly changed over the years. I was there for the first one – when the Richemont Group organized it and a host of non-Richemont Group brands participated. It has since evolved. Now, the Richemont Group is King — with every one of its 12 watch brands represented in grand glory. Also exhibiting are several other key brands, including Audemars Piguet, Greubel Forsey, Parmigiani Fleurier, Richard Mille and Ralph Lauren (which has a partnership with the Group for the production of its watches). Needless to say, this is ultra- high-end watchmaking at its best.

Over the years, though, many other brands have capitalized on the fact that thousands of journalists and retailers descend on the city to see the newest watch treasures that will be making trend headlines for the coming year. Those brands piggy-back on the SIHH –- exhibiting in hotel suites, boutiques and other places around the city. In short, what has happened is the luxury of SIHH is now offset with the dutiful job of running around the city of Geneva for appointment after appointment to see and report on all the other brands, as well. On this trip, which spanned six full days in Geneva, I explored the new timepieces from no fewer than 35 brands. It was an enriching and enlightening experience –- as always.

Outside SIHH 2014 in Geneva Attendees at SIHH 2014
Outside SIHH 2014 in Geneva Attendees at SIHH 2014
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So, what were the highlights of the trip? From the fun to the fantastic -– several experiences stand out.

Oxygen Oasis

SIHH 2014 Roberta Naas Braving the Breva Hyperbaric ChamberAt one of the top hotels in the city, a haute-horological brand named Breva was exhibiting its two collections of timepieces. Both revolve around tracking weather and atmospheric pressures via barometers and other instruments.

Since the weather in the hotel room was not changing, and because I wanted to actually see the watch work (ever the inquisitive journalist), I braved the hyperbaric chamber that the brand had on hand for demonstration purposes. I am told that for the entire week the brand exhibited there, just two journalists opted to enter the chamber. (Really? Aren’t we there to see the watch work?!).

So, in a surreal experience, I entered into the small chamber, allowed them to zipper me in tightly, waited while the oxygen loudly hissed in, and –- voila — pressed the button on the watch and witnessed a working indicator. Fabulous. (Though I will admit, it got hot in that chamber and I did panic just slightly at the end as they seemed to struggle with one of the zippers.)

Celebrity City

Every year at the SIHH, several brands bring in their brand ambassadors and celebrity friends to share star-studded dinners with attendees. Sometimes these stars are available for interviews, and usually I don’t bother to take too many up on their 15-minute gesture. This year, however, I jumped at the chance to interview screen legend Susan Sarandon. I found Susan to be charming, sincere, eloquent and interesting as she reflected on what time means to her. I was glad I took the 15 minute spot, even though it wreaked havoc with my crazy schedule.

Mishmash Meals

Kudos to Roger Dubuis, a brand that focused this year on blending the tradition of Swiss watchmaking with the turn-of-the-century Steam Punk inspirations and its visionary view of timepieces. Dinner with the brand was held in a steam punk-style building (now converted into a museum) built in the late 1800’s. The room was transformed by the very brilliant design director of Roger Dubuis into a turn-of-the-century marvel –- with chandeliers, china and stemware all flown in from Paris for the event. In fact, the stemware was original from the era and added a delightful twist to the evening. With the theme of looking back, while looking ahead, the room also housed some innovative photography (of people then and now in exactly the same spot as photographed while young), and some unusual sculptures. It was intriguing and inviting.

Roger Dubuis Booth at SIHH 2014 IWC Booth at SIHH 2014
Roger Dubuis Booth at SIHH 2014 IWC Booth at SIHH 2014
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This year I did not receive the usual half-dozen invitations to other luxe brand dinners (was I forsaken or blessed?), but I was able to spend some real quality time with brand execs at smaller dinners — thank you to Montblanc, Greubel Forsey and Jaeger-LeCoultre for those wonderful evenings (a big shout out to Roberto’s for amazing food). Thank you, too, to Hublot for one of those great nights to recap and relax. As to breakfast and lunch, there was rarely ever time, so thank you to all of the brands that kept me so busy I was able to lose a few pounds on this trip.

Terrific Timepieces

Lest we get all nostalgic over the exhibition spaces, the food, and the fun -– let’s remember why we are there at all: the product. This year did not disappoint! I witnessed some of the most stunning and technically advanced watchmaking. Key trends included amazingly artistic watch dials for women — complete with unusual gemstone treatments, dials made of rose petals –- Cartier stands out here, incomparable enamel and other innovative treatments.

Cartier Watches at SIHH 2014 A. Lange and Söhne Celestial Watch
Cartier Watches at SIHH 2014 A. Lange and Söhne Celestial Styled Watch at SIHH 2014
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Ultra-Thin Watch Piaget Ultra-Thin Watch
Ultra-Thin Watch at SIHH 2014 Piaget Ultra-Thin Watch at SIHH 2014
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The skies were calling this year, as well, with so many brands unveiling astronomical, celestial and moon-inspired pieces. The highlight: Van Cleef & Arpels, which actually managed to put the planets in 3D onto the watch dial. Unusual mechanics bloomed anew with brands such as Piaget reinterpreting the typical watch movement and building it into the case (the 900P caliber) to achieve an incredibly ultra-thin timepiece. In fact, the race was on among the brands to break records regarding the thinnest watch in the world.

Indeed, many of the timepieces unveiled this January that will make their way to the individual markets around the world in another six to nine months, stole my breath. But that’s another story.

About Roberta Naas

Roberta Naas is a 30-year veteran award-winning watch journalist. She is the founder of ATimelyPerspective.com and author of five books on timepieces. Roberta travels the world bringing behind-the-scenes news and cutting-edge products to the forefront.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupWatchmaker and wholesale watch distributor Gevril Group is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury, Swiss and fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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In Memoriam: Raymond Weil

Raymond Weil


by John Sealander  

Watchmaking Pioneer Raymond Weil Dies at 87

On January 26, 2014 one of the true pioneers of the Swiss watch industry passed away peacefully. Born in Geneva, Switzerland in 1926, Raymond Weil was the first in the industry to make luxury watches accessible to people who weren’t born with a personal fortune. This self-made man had the vision and courage to start what has become a beloved and world-renowned brand at a time when the entire Swiss watch industry was in crisis. In 1976, when Raymond Weil’s self-named company was launched, it was a widely held view that inexpensive quartz watches would destroy the Swiss watchmaking industry.

Weil had a different vision, and watch enthusiasts, amateurs and connoisseurs alike immediately praised his beautiful and surprisingly affordable creations. This kind, affable, and generous man was influential in keeping the Swiss watch industry alive at a critical point in its history. As Raymond Weil traveled the world putting together the international network that eventually made his timepieces a familiar favorite around the world, he almost singlehandedly became an exceptional ambassador for the city of Geneva and for Switzerland as well.

Weil’s ongoing love for Switzerland and it’s watchmaking industry led him to serve as president of the Geneva Watchmaker Union, as vice president of the Watchmaking Industry Training Centre, and as a member of the Watchmaking Federation. He also served as president of the Baselworld Exhibitors Committee until 1995.

Raymond Weil’s love of classical music and contemporary art often influenced the watches that his company produced. Over the years, many popular Raymond Weil timepieces, including the well-known Amadeus, Fidelio, Toccata, Fantasia and Parsifal Collections were inspired by the music and composers that Raymond loved.

To this day, the self-named company that this watchmaking pioneer founded remains one of the last independent, family-owned watchmakers in Switzerland. The brand continues to remain in the family, with Weil’s son-in-law Olivier Bernheim holding the position of CEO, Olivier’s elder son Elie, serving as marketing director, and his younger son Pierre as sales director. It is with great sadness that the Weil family announced the passing of their patriarch and founder on Sunday, January 26. They, and the entire Swiss watch industry can take comfort that the brand Raymond Weil launched in 1976 will continue to keep his memory alive for many years to come.

About Gevril Group

Gevril GroupWatchmaker and wholesale watch distributor Gevril Group is the exclusive U.S. agent for exquisitely designed and crafted European luxury and fashion watch brands, distributing and servicing some of the best affordable luxury, Swiss and fashion watches. Gevril Group also operates a full-service watch repair, staffed by master Swiss watchmakers. Contact Gevril Group by email or by calling 845-425-9882.

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